Nafta Trade Agreement With Mexico

The CUSMA results, signed on the sidelines of the G20 of Heads of State and Government in Buenos Aires in November 2018, preserve key elements of long-term trade relations and contain new and updated provisions to address 21st century trade issues and foster opportunities for the nearly half a billion people who call North America at home. USMCA Schedule 23-A calls on Mexico to pass laws that improve the ability of unions to make collective agreements. [44] The specific standards that Mexico must meet are set out in Convention 98 of the International Labour Organization on freedom of association and collective bargaining. The government of Mexican President Andrés Manuel Lépez Obrador passed a law in late 2018 that respects these international standards. Many analysts explain these differences in results by the fact that the Mexican economy is „two-speed”, where NAFTA has led the growth of foreign investment, high-tech production and wage growth in the industrial north, while the south, largely agricultural, has remained disconnected from this new economy. University of Pennsylvania economist Mauro Guillen argued that Mexico`s growing inequality is due to NAFTA workers receiving much higher wages from trade-related activities in the north. Much of the debate among political experts has focused on how to mitigate the negative effects of agreements such as NAFTA, including whether workers who lose their jobs are compensated or whether they are offering retraining programs to help them move into new sectors. Experts say programs such as U.S. Trade Adjustment Assistance (AAT), which helps workers pay for education or training to find new jobs, could help rebuke anger over trade liberalization.

On September 30, 2018, the deadline for negotiations between Canada and the United States, an interim agreement was reached between the two countries, thus retaining the trilateral pact when the Trump administration submits the agreement to Congress. [150] The new name of the agreement was the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and came into force on July 1, 2020. [151] [152] Many critics of NAFTA viewed the agreement as a radical experiment developed by influential multinationals who wanted to increase their profits at the expense of ordinary citizens of the countries concerned. Opposition groups argued that the horizontal rules imposed by nafta could undermine local governments by preventing them from enacting laws or regulations to protect the public interest.

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